Order a Reading from Me

Order a Reading from Me

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

Journey through my Decks: 3 of Coins

In this series of posts, I plan to discuss all of the Tarot cards in order, using a different deck for each card.

For this entry I chose to use The Fairytale Tarot designed by Karen Mahony and Alex Ukolov, with artwork by Irena Triskova (Magic Realist Press).

The Fairytale Tarot (Magic Realist Press)

"And as they sat thus, behold, a peal of thunder, and with the violence of the thunderstorm, lo there came a fall of mist, so thick that not one of them could see the other. And after the mist it became light all around. And when they looked towards the place where they were wont to see cattle, and herds, and dwellings, they saw nothing now, neither house, nor beast, nor smoke, nor fire, nor man, nor dwelling; but the houses of the Court empty, and desert, and uninhabited, without either man or beast within them. And truly all their companions were lost to them, without their knowing aught of what had befallen them, save those four only." ~ The Mabinogion*

This event, as reported in the Welsh Mabinogion, sets the stage for the fairytale on which this card is based. The tale, called "The Escape of the Mouse," also appears in the Lilac Fairy Book. Following the loss of their farms and possessions, the four friends decide to learn a trade. They learn to make saddles. However, they prove so good at it, that the local saddlers plan to murder them. They flee to another town, where they learn to make shields. The same thing happens again. In a third town, they make such exquisite shoes that no one will buy from other shoemakers. They are run out of town again.

This is the part of the story that relates directly to the Three of Coins, a card about "skill, hard work, and the recognition and admiration that come with such abilities." (Mahony) The number Three typically suggests a team effort or the involvement of more than one or two people. Mahony notes that this tale also calls our attention to the "problematic aspects" of becoming highly skilled and masterful at something. Such an achievement attracts admiration, to be sure, but can also engender jealousy and hostility. 

Divinatory Meanings provided by Mahony: Mastering a skill or craft # Becoming known for what you do # A justifiable pride in your attainment # Creating a masterpiece # Understanding that "overnight success" takes years of work.

If you are interested in reading the rest of the tale, including the part about the mouse, click _HERE_.

*The Mabinogion, translated by Gwyn Jones and Thomas Jones. Translation and introduction copyright Gwyn Jones and Thomas Jones, 1949. Revisions and additions, Gwyn Jones and Mair Jones, 1974. Revisions, additions and Index or Proper Names, Gwyn Jones and Mair Jones, 1989. Revisions, Gwyn Jones and Mair Jones, 1993. J.M. Dent, Orion Publishing Group and Charles E. Tuttle Co., Inc. ISBN 0-460-87297-4.

About the deck: Karen Mahony tells us that in creating The Fairytale Tarot, she and Alex Ukolov "wanted very definitely to make a deck for adults, a deck that acknowledged and appreciated these tales as they were originally told B complete with shadows and, sometimes, a dark sensuality." She writes that the cards are designed to "clearly relate to accepted tarot meanings, but in ways that are thought-provoking and expansive, and most importantly of all, transformative."


7 comments:

  1. Mostly there is only one person working in the three of coins and the others are watching. Nobody really knows what they are thinking.....
    "using a different deck for each card": Do you have 78 decks? :D

    ReplyDelete
  2. Hi Ellen. I have more than 78 decks, probably more like 88. :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. I like the image of this card but I have the same problem with it as I do with the Fairy Tale deck I own - Lisa Hunt's (I'm going to sell the box set almost unused) and that is that some of the fairy tales are obscure, well, at least to some of us and this in turn makes the images shown harder to relate to.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi Helen! I suppose we each use the cards in different ways for different purposes, and of course you have to do what works best for you concerning a specific deck!

      Delete
  4. Hi Zanna I think what I was trying to say was that if, in my case I didn't recognise what fairy story was being portrayed then the images were harder to relate to tarot meanings. That doesn't mean others find it that way. It was just my opinion. ^_^

    ReplyDelete
  5. The only problem with a "team" is that all ships might not sail together (Godfather III). If the team is bound by service to a common lord, then legally bound help may be cast out. Notice the man talking to the women saying "that's not how a person of duty would work this". So, it would be interesting to see if a card eludes to the fractured work relationship!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, I can see this card referring to a fractured work relationship. The man talking to the woman may be criticizing out of jealousy or genuine disagreement with the performance -- but either way, there is a sense of "not sailing together."

      Delete

Thank you for leaving a comment. I love hearing from my readers!
~ Zanna